nokia-808-pureview

Scenes from Crete (1) - captured with the Nokia 808 PureView and Lumia 1020

I've been making a selection from dozens and dozens of shots I captured during my week on Crete. I used the Nokia 808 PureView more than a long time (thanks to all of you encouraging me to do so again) - mostly in full resolution and with ND filter on. I used the Nokia Lumia 1020 a whole lot, too (34MP/5MP). And I did some occasional shooting with the Samsung Galaxy S5 as well.

Of course, I made some comparisons, and I've been cropping some of the results, but it just didn't feel right to do only that - it didn't do justice at all to the fun I had capturing these scenes. So this post isn't just about comparing, it's about the joy of using your mobile camera and sharing the results after having a great trip.

It's what most people do on Facebook, I know, but I'll share some more with you than just the shots - like some crops, and all the original files on Flickr. For new visitors it might be good to mention I didn't use a DSLR at all: everything you see was captured using the phones I mentioned. In fact, I haven't even owned a DSLR for years now, nor do I plan to by one ever again.

Here we go, it's a more or less random selection of shots. The first one is from the Nokia 808 PureView - white balance on sunny, ND filter on, and for some reason I still had the flash turned on. Maybe that's the reason the colors came out so well.

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As you may notice the parasols haven't even been set up although the sun was out that day - and although the air temperature may be fresh, the sun is already seriously burning by the end of April.

We came to Crete one week too early in fact, most villages and beaches were more or less deserted and the local Greek hotels and restaurants were slowly preparing for mass tourism that will start in the month of May.

Here's what the coast at the town of Stalida looks like on an early season day like that, captured with the Nokia Lumia 1020

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Detail in this shot is lovely by the way - check the crop of the stones in the foreground in the 5MP result

A low light ode to Nokia (808 PureView and Lumia 1020 and 1520, compared to Galaxy S5)

To tell you the truth I'm not sure where to begin this post. I have in fact a few dozens of shots to share with you, taken in several settings with the Nokia 808 PureView, Nokia Lumia 1020, Nokia Lumia 1520 and Samsung Galaxy S5.

It's the result of a brainwave I had early this morning: I really wanted to share some more low light shots before going on a short holiday, but doing so is pretty hard during daytime.

So I thought of a weird place in my basement. Logically, it's a few meters below the ground, but there is a very small window just in case you need to get out (a "fox hole" it's called here I think).

Anyway: that would provide me with what I needed: a very dark place and just a little bit of light. And after reading that Nokia's handset division is about to become " Microsoft Mobiles" I thought of the subject to capture in that low light as well: a weird collection of old and more or less rare Nokia devices.

Here's the original scene, captured with the Nokia 808 PureView with flash - so you'll get an idea about what I've been up to before you see the low light results.

Nokia 808 PureView - original scene with flash 2

So that's quite a remarkable bunch, itsn't it? It doesn't belong to me though, I borrowed all from a friend and what you see is far from complete even, but at least it gives me a colorful collage to capture in near darkness.

All shots are handheld. I made several shots with all four devices in all different settings and the best results were selected.

Where to start? The Nokia 808 PureView on ISO 50? Why not. Here's a resized version of the 38MP result in 16:9 aspect ratio - the 808 PureView needed the full 2.7 seconds (!) to capture this result:

Low light shots from the Nokia 808 PureView, Lumia 1020 and Samsung Galaxy S5

You asked for it - and I'm always glad to serve you here at the PureViewClub: low light shots captured with the Samsung Galaxy S5, compared with the Nokia Lumia 1020 and - by popular demand - the Nokia 808 PureView.

In previous posts - in much better light conditions - we've seen the Galaxy S5 performing very well. Most remarkable was the Galaxy S5 shots turned out a bit brighter, losing some contrast along the way.

One of the interesting "discoveries" was that when you use the "selective focus" option the Galaxy S5 will give you a >20MB file (read about it in this earlier post). Also, I've been impressed with the way it shows you what HDR does to your shot before capturing it.

I think on almost every occasion readers have been asking for a low light comparison - including the Nokia 808 PureView if possible. During a family visit this weekend I managed to capture this simple, but effective scene outside. I hope it will offer what you were looking for.

As usual I'll share these shots with a few disclaimers: these were captured in between "family affairs", so I guess that's why I wasn't concentrated enough to put the Lumia 1020 in 16:9 aspect ratio. It's not something you notice fast when you're shooting very dark scenes either, so I discovered I didn't only a day later.

There is one advantage though: in 4:3 you'll get most of the Lumia sensor, whereas the Galaxy S5 gives you the full 16MP in 16:9. One more thing: I only used the Nokia 808 PureView in 8MP PureView mode. I will bring the Nokia 808 PureView on a next short holiday soon, I promise you I'll make some low light shots in full resolution with it as well.

Let me start with the Nokia 808 PureView since you appear to have missed it so much (I must admit it was fun to work with it again :-) You'll see two results (both resized from the 8MP originals) - first in ISO 400 (1/2 econd)

2 Nokia 808 PureView - Balcony ISO 400Next: Nokia 808 PureView - ISO 800 (1/8 second) 140320_Nokia_BT_728x90_MB

Nokia's Pureview flagships, Samsung Galaxy Note 3, Sony Xperia Z1 Compact and: Jolla (1)

Thank you for your patience all. I've been enjoying "some" peace of mind, but I've been walking around with six smartphone cameras lately nevertheless. The three Nokia PureView flagships of course (808, 1020, 1520), the Samsung Galaxy Note 3, Sony's Xperia Z1 Compact and one (more or less) new kid on the block: the Jolla phone.

Jolla: a short introduction
Before I go on with my first comparisons, let me explain a little bit about Jolla. I won't write a review of the Jolla phone here - it's not what the PureViewClub is about, but I will provide you with some background information before I share some of its shots - and compare it with some of the big guns out there.

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First of all, for those who don't know, Jolla was formed by about 80 ex-Nokia employees who started the bold adventure to take "the road not taken". After Nokia took the decision to leave Symbian and choose Windows Phone, they started their own company to create a new smartphone based on their own OS called "Sailfish".

It will remind you of MeeGo when you see it for the first time, but there are differences, for instance in the way you "swype" your way through the menu. I found their initiative brave and inspiring (I have a natural sympathy for the underdog I guess), so I decided to order one and show my support.

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To be able to offer more applications than available in the original Jolla Store, you have the possibility to use Android stores like Yandex for applications - interestingly enough, it's the exact same route Nokia now takes with it's "forked Android" Nokia X devices.

As I already own a few Android devices, I've been waiting for the Jolla Store to grow, which it apparantly does, but as an average user, you will still need to turn to Android I guess. Without wanting to offend anyone, I think the Jolla phone still is a bit of a "geeky" device. I have the Jolla for a few months already to be honest, but I've been waiting for updates before writing anything about it.

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Jolla has been a somewhat disappointing experience for me in the beginning, although I really did like its design from the start: in a worldwide market loaded with different brands that all have their own devices, it's no small achievement to think of a design that is genuinely new and original.

The Jolla slogan is "we are unlike" and that is very well chosen. You'll recognize a Jolla smartphone directly by it's looks and the same goes for the Sailfish user interface: there's simply nothing like it (apart from MeeGo maybe, which never was a very large OS).

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You can even buy a different " other half" - a new back cover that will directly change the way your Jolla screen looks like - and there are more "other halfs" to come, putting a different emphasis on the way you use your device. Only thing is I find these other halfs quite expensive at €29 (but I will get one if they think of realizing one that is centred around the camera functionality :-)

After its recent, important update to "Ohijärvi" the Sailfish OS has left the beta stage. Also, the (only 4MP) camera has seen a major impovement in terms of settings etc. Now you can adjust Light sensitivity (from ISO 100 to 400) and choose different white balance (Cloudy, Sunny, Fluorescent and Tungsten).

You can tap to focus or set it to infinity or continuous autofocus. You can set a delay up to 10 seconds. Still, it's no more than 4MP: 3264 x 1840 pixels in 16:9, and you can't shoot in 4:3. Here's a shot I captured from the Jolla settings menu.

Jolla Camera Settings

What Nokia PureView flagship to choose: the Lumia 1020 or 1520? Or still the 808 PureView?

What Nokia PureView flagship to choose: the Lumia 1020, the newest Lumia 1520? Or still: the 808 PureView? I'm getting the question more and more often these days - and boy it's a pretty tough one to answer. Like so often in life, it all really depends on your personal situation and preferences.

So I'll just share my thoughts here for whoever is pondering on the same issue. This has become a pretty long post, and to those who already know what they want or like what they have, there might be not much news to read in this post, but you might be willing to add a few suggestions of your own.

I'll illustrate this post with some of the shots I got from all three devices, working with them over the past months or even years. Click on the shot to see the original on Flickr (or OneDrive). Like this shot very dear to me, captured on the first day I could actually use the Nokia 808 PureView I had been looking forward to so much.

Nokia 808 PureViewClub - Now Famous Husky 640 x 480

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